Tuesday, January 17

And the award for silliest political commentary goes to . . .

I was doing some quick research for a "best and worst dressed at the Golden Globes post" and came across this paragraph from the misnamed Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

Monday night, in George W. Bush's America, movies about a transgendered person, an endearing love between two gay cowboys, a dark horse of a country singer who sang about shooting a man in Reno just to watch him die and two films showing the very human roots of Muslim suicide bombers won awards on national television.

Maybe "D. Parvaz" should abandon deductive reasoning from faulty premises (Bush administration = tyranny) and switch over to the inductive brand. Then he might figure out that a country in which these things at which he marvels do occur--and "on national television!"--is still the freest in the world.

While I'm at it, they aren't cowboys; they herd sheep, they're shepherds. Gay shepherds. Not that, etc . . .

Towards the end of the article, the author shows again why entertainment reporters should not be let off their leashes:

[I]magine our [our?] surprise when "Paradise Now" -- credited to a country not recognized by most contemporary atlases, Palestine -- won and director Hany Abu-Assad said he saw the award "as a recognition that the Palestinians deserve their liberty and equality unconditionally." Pinch us, we must be dreaming . . .

Yeah, and you're still dreaming if you think a movie about gay shepherds would ever be made or shown in Palestine. It reminds me of the story Prof. Dershowitz tells about the "Gays for Palestine" sign he saw in Berkeley. As he likes to tell his audiences, you can be "gay for Palestine" in Berkeley, but you can't be "gay for Palestine" in Palestine.